Meniscus Tear

Meniscus tear. Kinvara Private Hospital, Rotherham, South Yorkshire.

What is a meniscus tear?

Do you suffer from knee pain, stiffness or locking? If so, you may have a meniscus tear which is one of the most common types of knee injury.

The meniscus (pl. mensci) are crescent-shaped pieces of cartilage positioned between the femur and tibia. Their purpose is to protect the joint surfaces, act as shock absorbers and keep the knee stable. Each knee has a medial and lateral meniscus and together they are essential for normal knee function. They can tear if you suddenly twist your knee whilst bearing weight on it and if left untreated, can worsen and lead to complications.

At Kinvara Private Hospital our specialist Orthopaedic Surgeons are highly experienced at treating meniscus tears.

What are the symptoms of a meniscus tear?

The symptoms of a meniscus tear depend on the severity of the tear. Some patients with a small tear may have minimal symptoms and be able to walk and bend their knee without pain. At the time of injury, you may hear a popping sound or a feeling that the knee is ‘giving way’. Other typical symptoms in the knee include;

• Pain and tenderness
• Swelling
• Inability to fully bend or straighten the knee
• Reduced range of motion in the knee i.e. stiffness
• A feeling that your knee is locking or catching

Frequently Asked Questions

Guide Price

£7,437

No referral necessary

OR

If you’re paying for your own treatment you may want to consider spreading the cost of your treatment using a medical loan from Loansfortreatments.com.

Guide Price

£7,437

No referral necessary

OR

If you’re paying for your own treatment you may want to consider spreading the cost of your treatment using a medical loan from Loansfortreatments.com.

Testimonials

Better than NHS

“Really good experience. Drs, nurses and all staff were really friendly. Drs came and explained procedure and didn't waste time

So much better than the NHS,”

Haadi Z

Well looked after

"Well looked after. Lovely room. Everyone very friendly and informative as well as being caring"

Lisa Gregory

My Treatment Was Excellent!

Kinvara was recommended to me by a good friend who had her bunion fixed there. My treatment was excellent and I’m back playing golf. Wouldn’t hesitate in recommending Kinvara.

P.J

Treatment at a Glance

Anaesthesia Icon
Anaesthesia

General

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Duration

1-3 Hours

Length of stay Icon
Length of Stay

Daycase

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Recovery

12 Weeks

Health Insurance Providers We Work With

Meet our Specialists

Mr Zain Abiddin

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

Ms Helena Antoniadou

Consultant Plastic Surgeon

Mr Shankar Thiagarajah

Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

Mr Antony Wilkinson

Consultant Podiatric Surgeon

Mr Radwan Faraj

Consultant Gynaecologist

Mr Patrick Jassar

Consultant ENT Surgeon

Frequently Asked Questions for a Meniscus Tear

  • What are the causes of a meniscus tear?

      The most common way to tear the meniscus is to forcefully twist your knee whilst placing full weight of your body on that knee. Athletes often perform this movement and commonly present with a meniscus injury. However, meniscus tears are not exclusive to athletes and can also occur in older patients as a result of cartilage ‘wear and tear’.

  • What are the symptoms of a meniscus tear?

      The symptoms of a meniscus tear depend on the severity of the tear. Some patients with a small tear may have minimal symptoms, and be able to walk and bend their knee without pain.
      Those who do have symptoms, typically report;
      • Knee pain, especially when twisting or rotating the knee
      • A ‘popping’ sound at the time of injury
      • Knee swelling or stiffness
      • Inability to fully bend or straighten the knee
      • A feeling that the knee is locking, catching or ‘giving way’
      • Limping

  • How are meniscus tears diagnosed?

      Diagnosis of a meniscus tear begins with a full history and examination. Although this information can strongly suggest a meniscus tear, your surgeon may request a MRI scan to confirm the diagnosis.

      If the tear is located at the edge of the meniscus it may not be readily visible on the MRI and your doctor may recommend an arthroscopy. This is a surgical procedure in which a small camera is inserted into the knee and they can directly see the meniscus. Corrective surgery can be performed at the same time.

  • What does meniscus tear surgery involve?

      The treatment for a meniscus tear depends on many factors such as the nature of the tear, patient age and level of activity.

      A non-surgical approach may be favoured for small tears in the outer third of the meniscus. Your surgeon may recommend;

      • Resting the knee by avoiding weight-bearing or activities that worsen the pain
      • Elevating the knee to reduce swelling
      • Pain relief
      • Physiotherapy to strengthen the muscles acting on the knee
      • Knee wrap
      • Steroid injection to reduce inflammation

      If these measures fail, your surgeon may recommend arthroscopic surgery to remove all or part of the torn meniscus (meniscectomy). The surgery is typically performed under general anaesthesia and takes about 1 hour.

      Immediately after surgery, you may be required to wear a knee brace or use crutches.

  • What are the risks of meniscus tear surgery?

      Every surgery carries risks and although they are uncommon, it is important you consider these risks as part of informed consent.

      Risks that are specific to knee arthroscopy include;

      Injury to the cartilage, ligaments, meniscus, blood vessels, or nerves of the knee
      Bleeding inside the knee joint
      Infection inside the knee or at the ‘stab’ incision sites
      Deep vein thrombosis
      Knee stiffness
      Risks that apply to all surgery include;

      Anaesthetic complications such as allergic reactions, breathing difficulties

      The decision to perform surgery is made when the benefits outweigh the risks and should be made after discussing all options with your surgeon.

  • What's the recovery from meniscus surgery?

      Recovery after meniscus surgery depends on the extent of surgery. After uncomplicated surgery, you will be able to bear weight on the knee whilst standing but need to walk with crutches for the first 2-7 days. With rehabilitation, full range of motion is usually achieved by 2 weeks. Sports and heavy lifting should be delayed until 6 weeks.